Translation that works for you: gather your documents for study permit in Canada

Source: www.cic.gc.ca

What documents are required?


Use the Document Checklist (IMM 5483) (PDF, 297.34KB) to assist you in gathering the supporting documents to submit with your application.

Important information: If you do not submit a complete application, your application may be rejected and this will delay the processing of your application.

Translation of documents

You must submit the following for any document that is not in English or French, unless otherwise stated on your document checklist:

the English or French translation; andan affidavit from the person who completed the translation (see below for details); anda certified copy of the original document.

Important information: Translations must not be done by the applicants themselves nor by an applicant’s parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew or first cousin.

Translators who are certified in Canada don’t need to supply an affidavit. A certified translator will provide both a certified translation and certified copies of the original documents.

An affidavit is a document on which the translator has sworn, in the presence of a person authorized to administer oaths in the country where the translator is living, that the contents of their translation are a true translation and representation of the contents of the original document.

The affidavit must be sworn in the presence of:

In Canada:

a notary public

a commissioner of oaths

a commissioner of taking affidavits

Authority to certify varies by province and territory. Consult your local provincial or territorial authorities.

Outside of Canada:

a notary public

Authority to administer oaths varies by country. Consult your local authorities.

Certified true copies

To have a photocopy of a document certified, an authorized person must (as described below) compare the original document to the photocopy and must print the following on the photocopy:

“I certify that this is a true copy of the original document”,the name of the original document, the date of the certification,their name, their official position or title, and their signature.

Who can certify copies?

Only authorized people

Important information: Certifying of copies must not be done by the applicants themselves nor by an applicant’s parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew or first cousin.

Persons authorized to certify copies include the following:

In Canada:

a notary public

a commissioner of oaths

a commissioner of taking affidavits

Authority to certify varies by province and territory. Check with your local provincial or territorial authorities to learn who has the authority to certify.

Outside Canada:

a notary public

Authority to certify international documents varies by country. Check with your local authorities to learn who has the authority to certify in your country.


#translationthatworksforyou #effectivetranslation

8 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All